ARTICLES FROM MEMBERS

THE CONSTANT CONTESTANT By Audrey Dargan, competing since 1982 I joined The University Club in 1982.  At that time I had a job with the Australian National University as a Staff Counsellor.  My role was a heavy one, and looking back now, I realise the emotional pressures on me were great. Then a public speaking club was formed at the ANU, The University Club, and in 1982 and I became a Charter member. Read more…  

THE CONSTANT CONTESTANT

By Audrey Dargan, competing since 1982

I joined The University Club in 1982.  At that time I had a job with the Australian National University as a Staff Counsellor.  My role was a heavy one, and looking back now, I realise the emotional pressures on me were great.

Then a public speaking club was formed at the ANU, The University Club, and in 1982 and I became a Charter member.

Read more…  


BEING A CHIEF AMBASSADOR FOR PATHWAYS By Jan Vecchio DTM, Pathways Chief Ambassador Being Chief Ambassador for Pathways has its challenges, successes and rewards.  When I was appointed to this role in August 2013, it was to be for 12-18 months.  It is now July 2017. Read more…    

BEING A CHIEF AMBASSADOR FOR PATHWAYS

By Jan Vecchio DTM, Pathways Chief Ambassador

Being Chief Ambassador for Pathways has its challenges, successes and rewards.  When I was appointed to this role in August 2013, it was to be for 12-18 months.  It is now July 2017.

Read more…    

60 YEARS OF TOASTMASTERS IN AUSTRALIA By Kathryn McClelland The inaugural meeting of Wollongong Toastmasters was held on the 1st November 1956 in the California Apartments in Burelli Street.   The club was initiated by a gentleman who had attended Toastmasters in Canada where his best friend was President of the first club to be started in that country.  Read more…    

60 YEARS OF TOASTMASTERS IN AUSTRALIA

By Kathryn McClelland

The inaugural meeting of Wollongong Toastmasters was held on the 1st November 1956 in the California Apartments in Burelli Street.  

The club was initiated by a gentleman who had attended Toastmasters in Canada where his best friend was President of the first club to be started in that country. 

Read more…    

WHY Toastmasters has the power to change our world By Andrew Geraghty, Canberra University Toastmasters Dr Andrew Newberg, a neuroscientist at Thomas Jefferson University, and Mark Robert Waldman, a communications expert, recently wrote a book called “Words Can Change Your Brain.” A key proposition they made was that “a single word has the power to influence the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress”. Read more…   

WHY Toastmasters has the power to change our world

By Andrew Geraghty, Canberra University Toastmasters

Dr Andrew Newberg, a neuroscientist at Thomas Jefferson University, and Mark Robert Waldman, a communications expert, recently wrote a book called “Words Can Change Your Brain.”

A key proposition they made was that “a single word has the power to influence the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress”.

Read more…   

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF HUMOUR By Kay Wood ACB ALB, Semi Annual Conference Chair Theatre is represented by two masks. One depicts Drama the other Comedy. Playwrights of old understood that even the darkest play needs a lighter side. Today even the scariest movie have some wonderful one liners or moments of fun to break the tension. Plays and speeches – and life for that matter – need comic relief. Read more…    

THE IMPORTANCE OF HUMOUR

By Kay Wood ACB ALB, Semi Annual Conference Chair

Theatre is represented by two masks. One depicts Drama the other Comedy. Playwrights of old understood that even the darkest play needs a lighter side. Today even the scariest movie have some wonderful one liners or moments of fun to break the tension. Plays and speeches – and life for that matter – need comic relief.

Read more…    

WHAT MAKES HUMOUR By John Jennings DTM, Program Quality Director When I was first asked to write an article about “What makes Humour”, my first thought was, not me! And I guess that’s my point, humour really is very subjective. What one person finds amusing, another won’t. When it comes to analysing what’s funny, and what’s not, Humour has to be considered a grey area. The good practitioner can call themselves an Artist, and the not so good, well, others may call a ham! Read more…    

WHAT MAKES HUMOUR

By John Jennings DTM, Program Quality Director

When I was first asked to write an article about “What makes Humour”, my first thought was, not me! And I guess that’s my point, humour really is very subjective. What one person finds amusing, another won’t. When it comes to analysing what’s funny, and what’s not, Humour has to be considered a grey area. The good practitioner can call themselves an Artist, and the not so good, well, others may call a ham!

Read more…    


WHY PEOPLE SHOULD ENTER CONTESTS By Sonja Anderson, Past Lachlan Division Director A contest is a competition to find the best, a winner in what we are competing for, perhaps a reign for supremacy, there are many things we can and could compete for, and all that is needed is the desire to want to. With Toastmasters it is within the public speaking arena 4 different categories, humorous speech, impromptu speech, evaluation and the much prized international speech... WOW something for everyone? Read more…    

WHY PEOPLE SHOULD ENTER CONTESTS

By Sonja Anderson, Past Lachlan Division Director

A contest is a competition to find the best, a winner in what we are competing for, perhaps a reign for supremacy, there are many things we can and could compete for, and all that is needed is the desire to want to.

With Toastmasters it is within the public speaking arena 4 different categories, humorous speech, impromptu speech, evaluation and the much prized international speech... WOW something for everyone?

Read more…    


HUMOROUS SPEECH OR A SPEECH WITH HUMOUR By Susan Newton DTM, Registrations Officer So, you are preparing a speech – perhaps you have been invited to make a presentation at a conference, a wedding day speech or perhaps you have decided to enter the Humorous Speech contest. Is there a difference I hear you ask? After all, whatever you are doing, the speech will have an opening, a body and a conclusion. You will still need to capture attention in the first few sentences, then elaborate your theme and finally tie your thoughts into a coherent and possible pithy conclusion. Read more…    

HUMOROUS SPEECH OR A SPEECH WITH HUMOUR

By Susan Newton DTM, Registrations Officer

So, you are preparing a speech – perhaps you have been invited to make a presentation at a conference, a wedding day speech or perhaps you have decided to enter the Humorous Speech contest.

Is there a difference I hear you ask? After all, whatever you are doing, the speech will have an opening, a body and a conclusion. You will still need to capture attention in the first few sentences, then elaborate your theme and finally tie your thoughts into a coherent and possible pithy conclusion.

Read more…    

PEOPLE WHO SHAPED OUR IMAGES OF HUMOUR By Mike Kano-McCallum DTM, Area 15 Director, Strategy & Risk Committee Member Humour – I’m going with the chuckle, laugh, giggle or groan variety. Humour is very cultural. In certain cultures it is not ok to make a lot of public noise, or it should be applause only. Here in Australia I think we are a mostly ribald bunch, we laugh when we want to, and our humour can be quite risqué by world standards. Read more…    

PEOPLE WHO SHAPED OUR IMAGES OF HUMOUR

By Mike Kano-McCallum DTM, Area 15 Director, Strategy & Risk Committee Member

Humour – I’m going with the chuckle, laugh, giggle or groan variety. Humour is very cultural. In certain cultures it is not ok to make a lot of public noise, or it should be applause only.

Here in Australia I think we are a mostly ribald bunch, we laugh when we want to, and our humour can be quite risqué by world standards.

Read more…    

STEPPING UP FROM SPEECHCRAFT By Richard Davie, VPPR, The Saints Toastmasters “Death is the number two fear that people have and public speaking is the first!” - Sydney Sheldon. This is exactly how I used to feel anytime there was a mention of Speech and Me in the same sentence. With all my energy, I would duck, dodge, weave to avoid those two words coming together, but with more and more certainty and with ever more regularity, Speech and Me would collide. Read more…    

STEPPING UP FROM SPEECHCRAFT

By Richard Davie, VPPR, The Saints Toastmasters

Death is the number two fear that people have and public speaking is the first!” - Sydney Sheldon.

This is exactly how I used to feel anytime there was a mention of Speech and Me in the same sentence. With all my energy, I would duck, dodge, weave to avoid those two words coming together, but with more and more certainty and with ever more regularity, Speech and Me would collide.

Read more…